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Fourteen Vermont Maple Products You Havent Tried Before

We shout it from the rooftops: Vermont is the nation’s No. 1 producer of maple syrup. That means we use it in and on everything, so we can confirm has a lot of different uses beyond your favorite pancake topping. To help you hop on the maple bandwagon, we put together a quick rundown of 14 different Vermont maple products we love – how many have you tried? Check them off the list during the Vermont Maple 100, happening now through the end of October. Use a product? Tag us @vermonttourism and use the hashtag #vermontmaple100.  

Now, let’s check out this sweet list: 

1. Triple Maple Nipple Ale from Lawson’s Finest Liquids 
It’s no surprise we started our list with a beer – Vermont holds the title for the most breweries per capita. Lawson’s is a shining example of a Vermont brewer using maple syrup. Starting in a sugarhouse, Lawson’s Finest Liquids now calls a large lodge and tasting room home in the heart of downtown Waitsfield, Vermont. Triple Maple Nipple Ale put head brewer Sean Lawson on the map; it was so limited, you had to call ahead to reserve a bottle at the Waitsfield General Store. Now, luckily, it’s widely available across Vermont.  

2. Tree Tapper from Citizen Cider 
With roots in an old fort, Citizen Cider is now a leader in hard cider and seltzer production. From their website, Tree Tapper is fermented with Runamok maple syrup (you’ll see them later in this list), red wine yeast, aged on untoasted oak and infused with dark Belgian candi syrup to add rich and hearty characteristics reminiscent of the season and the good maple farmers at the sugarhouse. Find it at their tasting room on Pine Street in Burlington, VT or at your local convenience or grocery store.  

3. Maple Butter from Ploughgate Creamery 
Butter is butter, right? Not so fast. The maple butter from Ploughgate Creamery in Fayston, Vermont elevates butter from a spread to an art form. This is not your typical stick butter. It’s formed by hand, wrapped, and delivered to specialty stores all over the state and beyond. Try the cultured butter at room temperature on a piece of Red Hen bread or a fresh-baked roll from Klinger’s Bread. Thank us later. 

4. Sap! Maple Water 
When you think of maple syrup, most people think of boiling the sap down into maple syrup. It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup. Thankfully, a couple of young Vermonters founded Sap! Maple Water and made use of the original sap from maple trees. It’s canned locally in Middlebury, Vermont in a number of flavors and is sweet, slightly bubbly, and refreshing. Cans are available across the state. 

5. Maple Cream Doughnut from Madeline’s Bakery 
Have you ever needed to call ahead for a donut before? At Madeline’s Bakery in Milton, Vermont, that can certainly be the case on the weekends. Their donuts are the real deal—and the maple cream donuts are delicious. Get there early when they are hot and fresh from the oven. 

6. Maple Block from Vermont Country Store 
Maple comes in many forms: syrup, sugar, cream—and even blocks. Vermont Country Store has a maple block you can shave off, similar to a sugar cube. It’s fun to use and adds a great flavor to oatmeal or ice cream. 

7. Maple Creemee from Palmer Lane Maple 
Speaking of ice cream, this wouldn’t be a credible list without a nod to the maple creemee. There are tons of companies offering this ubiquitous summer treat, but Palmer Lane Maple in Jericho, Vermont takes it to another level. Packed with maple flavor and rolled in maple sprinkles (you read that right), this is the ultimate maple creemee experience. 

8. Smoked Maple Cheddar from Grafton Village Cheese 
Another cornerstone of Vermont is our access to some of the world’s best cheese. Winner of countless awards, Grafton Village Cheese makes a smoked maple cheddar that is a perfect accompaniment to your cheese board or a quick snack with a fresh-picked apple. 

9. Coffee-Infused Maple Syrup from Runamok Maple 
There are a lot of different spins on maple syrup — it’s not just four simple grades anymore. Companies are aging and infusing maple syrup with innovative flavors. A company that takes this practice to heart is Runamok Maple in Fairfax, Vermont. This coffee-infused syrup is just as good as it sounds. Who needs coffee Sunday morning, anyway? Looking for something else unique? Try their limited run of Strawberry Rose Infused maple syrup. 

10. Pure Vermont Maple Cream from Mt. Mansfield Maple Products 
Another classic Vermont product is maple cream. Often overlooked for traditional maple syrup, maple cream is a Vermont delicacy. It’s made by heating maple syrup, letting it cool, and then whipping it until it forms a cream or butter. We like to eat it straight from the container, but if you need a vessel, try crackers, bagels or toast. 

11. Carolina Reaper-Infused Maple Syrup from Benito’s Hot Sauce 
Another infused maple syrup lands on our list, but this time it’s turning up the heat. Benito’s Hot Sauce in Morrisville, Vermont makes and bottles each product by hand. And of course, they use the world’s hottest pepper. There’s also ghost pepper-infused syrup and chipotle barrel-aged syrup. As you can imagine, a little goes a long way here. 

12. Maple Cotton Candy from Parker’s Maple 
It’s not blue. It’s not pink either. It’s light tan. And it’s incredible. This fluffy, light confection has a hint of maple flavor perfect for exploring the backroads of Vermont or even just watching “Super Troopers 2.” Available across the state for all to enjoy. 

13. Vermont Maple Popcorn from Butternut Mountain Farm 
Speaking of movie snacks, maple popcorn ranks high on our list of maple things to try. Once you open the bag, maple wafts out and you’re transported to crunchy, sweet, salty bliss. Try not to eat the whole bag. 

14. Maple Biscuits from August First 
Last on our list is the tallest biscuit we’ve ever seen—and it’s made with maple syrup. That’s the maple biscuit from August First bakery in Burlington, Vermont. Served warm on a small plate, this flaky, buttery pastry hits the spot. They’re in limited supply, so pick one up while you can—and grab a loaf of bread while you’re there. 

We understand there are far more products in Vermont made with maple—these are just a couple you may want to try during the Vermont Maple 100, a fall celebration of all things maple in Vermont. Tried a new maple product? Tag us on social media, @vermonttourism and @vtagriculture and use the hashtag #vtmaple100.